New Comic Book Day top 5: Oct. 12th

Hello Revuers! Tomorrow marks a fantastic New Comic Book Day. It’s the best day of the week in my opinion. I’m looking forward to many titles but for this segment, as always, I have narrowed it down to my top 5. Two titles are from DC, two are from Image and one title is from Marvel. If you agree or don’t agree wit my picks let me know in the comment section below. I love hearing each week what our readers are picking up! Without further delay let’s jump right in.

 

5: Supergirl #2

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Supergirl #2 comes to us from the creative team of writer Steve Orlando and artist Brian Ching. This issues sees Supergirl clash with Cyborg Superman who was revealed at the end of issue 1 of Supergirl. Supergirl #2 was a vast improvement on the Rebirth special issue of Supergirl, and I look for issue 2 to continue this trend. The reveal of Cyborg Superman at the end of issue one was a surprise and sets up an interesting antagonist for Supergirl to face off against. The art by Brian Ching was superb, building a world that’s aesthetically pleasing and unique. The variant covers by Bengal have been some of my favorite variant cover work to date. I can’t wait to pick up issue 2 tomorrow.

 

4: Southern Cross #8

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Southern Cross #8 is written by Becky Cloonan with art from Andy Belanger. This series from Image comics has been consistently one of the best series’ they put out. I love the genre bending the story explores. Is this series Sci-Fi? Is it horror? A little of both? The driving mystery of the series keeps the reader coming back for more and more. This issue sees the continuation of the story arc ‘ROMULUS’ The second story arc of the series. I don’t want to go into too much detail and spoil the first arc for you so I’ll just say this. Spaceship. Paranormal activity. Government conspiracy. All of the covers are by the spectacular Becky Cloonan, who is just as talented of an artist as she is a writer. If you haven’t read this series yet, so yourself a favor and pick up the first trade (it’s only $9.99!). Read it, and then go buy the new issues.

 

3: Great Lakes Avengers

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I was a pretty big fan of the origianl volume of the Great Lakes Avengers, so when Marvel announced that a new series featuring the GLA would be part of their (newest) NOW! initiative I was excited. The series comes from writer Zac Gorman and artist Will Robinson. The story shows that the GLA have been reinstated as members of the Avengers and have been moved to a new headquarters in Detroit. Detroit is about 3 hours away from where I live so that’s kind of exciting for me (I know, I’m a huge nerd).  IT looks like all of the original members are back except maybe Squirrel Girl (who is seen in cut out form in the cover). I’m sure that this new series will follow in the humorous tradition of the previous volume.

 

2: All-Star Batman #3

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All-Star Batman is written by Batman scribe Scott Snyder, with art by John Romita Jr and features some of the best color work in any comic book series on the shelves today, from Dean White. At the close of the last issue we see that even those that Batman trusts the most have turned on him. It’s one thing when it’s Two Face and some bounty hunters you have to worry about, but what will Batman do now that even the police are after him? This road trip with one of his most deadly enemies has turned out to be quite the handful. I dare say that this series is one of the top series’ in the stellar Rebirth initiative by Dc Comics. I think it benefits a lot from being on the traditional once a month schedule as opposed to the twice monthly pace of most of DC’s big titles. This once a month schedule allows Snyder to take his time developing the story. The art by Romita JR. doesn’t feel rushed at all, but rather sweeping and grandiose. As I mentioned before the color work by Dean White is next level work. Truly an All-Star creative team for All-Star Batman.

 

1: Reborn

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The big guns are out for Reborn, a new series from Image comics written by Mark Millar with art by Greg Capullo. The general plot deals with the idea: Where do I go after I die? In this series you go to a place that’s not heaven or hell, but rather a place where you have to fight to survive. A place where you have to make a reckoning with everyone you ever wronged or treated nicely. The story sounds interesting and I trust Mark Millar will do a magnificent job. What really intrigues me is the art by Greg Capullo. This is the first comic book project for Capullo since his legendary run on the New 52 Batman with Scott Snyder. I am excited to see the world that he create for the readers. One of his strongest area is in character design (he designed the current Batman look), so I am curious what he will do having free reign over an environment. Not having any limitations should produce some incredible work from the comic book veteran. All in all this series has me intrigued.

 

So there you have it! Did your most anticipated books make the cut? Tell us in the comments below. We would also love to see your list of most anticipated comics!

 

-Andrew

 

 

Covers of the Week: Oct. 5th

Hello Revuers! It’s time for another installment on Covers of the Week. This segment is where I pick my favorite regular cover and variant cover of the week. This week there were many covers I could have picked but in the end I settled on just two. My favorite regular cover and my favorite variant cover. Now, when I choose my favorite covers it doesn’t have to be from a series I’m reading, but rather just my favorite cover in general. Let’s get to it:

 

My favorite regular cover this week is:

Godzilla Rage Across Time #2

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Since the Godzilla franchise moved to IDW, the series has featured a plethora of amazing covers. This new series Godzilla Rage Against Time by writers Chris Mowry and Kahlil Schweitze and artist Tadd Galusha is no exception. This cover by Bob Eggleton features Godzilla eating pillars from mount Olympias. The almost painted quality of the cover is beautiful. It’s really his attention to detail on Godzilla’s skin that makes this cover stand out. The muted color palette adds to the cover. All in all a solid cover by a fantastic artist.

 

My favorite variant cover is:

Jessica Jones #1

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This variant cover by David Aja is for the newest volume of Jessica Jones (was called Alias, but was changed so it wouldn’t be confused with the TV show from the early 2000’s. Also to line up with the Netflix show Jessica Jones). I really love the story this cover tells. You can get a sense of who Jessica Jones is just by studying the cover. The tri-color palette is perfect for the series as it has more of a noir feel to it than most of the other series’ that MArvel is producing. The light splattering of red looks like blood splatters and adds a nice effect.The series its’ self brings back the original creators with writer Brian Michael Bendis and artist Michael Gaydos. The first volume was published on Marvel’s MAX imprint. The MAX imprint featured more mature content than Marvel’s main line. While this newest volume of Jessica Jones was more mature than most of Marvel’s current lineup it still was quite toned down from the first volume. I would still recommend picking it up though.

 

Was your favorite cover on the list? If not tell me what your favorite of the week was in the comment section below!

Tales From the Pull List (04/06/2016): A Widows Peak

Hello Revuers! Its time for another edition of Tales From the Pull List. After several quiet weeks in a row, this NCBD turned into an embarrassment of riches. In fact of the last three years of religiously participating in NCBD this may have been my favorite week ever. Such tremendous talent and titles! So who won this week?  Well it was super close but in in the end only one title can be chosen as Pick of the Week. Read on to find out which one it was!

 

Pick of The Week

Black Widow #2: In what many might call an upset, this weeks Pick of the Week is Black Widow #2 by Matk Waid, Chris Samnee, and Matthew Wilson. Issue number two flashes back to one week prior to the last issue. Here we are given a funeral scene of an unnamed agent with Maria Hill and Agent Elder discussing the circumstances of the agents death. We find out that the Black Widow is at least party responsible. Then in a breath taking succession of pages and panels we see the Black Widow protecting Hill and Elder from a would be assassin team. In the end it’s Widow vs. a lone assassin. It’s then that she discovers the assassins true purpose at the funeral. No spoilers though so go out and get your own issue (if you haven’t done so already). This series is the creative team of Waid, Samnee, and Wilson’s second series together after a legendary run on Daredevil. I can honestly say that I can’t think of a better book for them to be on (Ok maybe Amazing Spider-Man, but I’m probably biased because Spider-Man is my favorite). The artwork by Samnee perfectly captures the feel and aesthetic of the world Waid has created for the Black Widow. The color work done by Matthew Wilson is spectacular, like it would be anything else, as it always is. Wilson is perhaps the greatest, most prolific color artist I have ever seen. Just this week alone I bought two titles colored by him (both were fantastic). All in all a great issue that builds suspense, reveals some of the Black Widows motivations for doing what she did last issue, introduces a new villain, and lets us watch the Black Widow single handedly take out a team of assassins. A very good issue indeed. Rating: 9.5/10

 

Buy

Black Panther #1: A great first issue on a much hyped debut. Ta-Nehisi Coates was under heavy pressure to perform and I must say he slayed it. If it hadn’t been for such an amazing issue of the Black Widow, Black Panther would have been my Pick of the Week. The artwork by Brian Stelfreeze is breathtaking. The color work by Laura Martin does a fantastic job of accenting and world building. Black Panther truly delivers this week and I can’t wait for issue 2. Rating: 9/10

The Wicked + The Divine #18: It’s back! And so is someone else. A great return for my favorite creative team in the business. Gillen, McKelvie, Wilson, and Cowles deliver a unforgettable issue full of action and destruction. In the letter at the end Gillen described this arc as “Taylor Swift’s Bad blood video for 6 issues”. I can’t wait for more of that. Rating 8/10

Mighty Morphin Power Rangers #2: In this issue we learn more of the Rita’s grand scheme with the green power ranger. We also get more action that was lacking from the last issue. The page art of the dinozord underwater was some of the coolest art I saw this week. Fantastic! A great installment in this series that keeps me wanting for more. Rating: 7/10

Spider-Women Alpha: The first issue in this summers Spider family event. It sees Spider-Woman, Spider-Gwen, and Silk team up to take on crepes, Er I mean creeps, brunch, ball pits, clowns, o yeah and villains. We see them travel through inter dimensional space, fight adaptoid robots, and wind a sitter! This issue was a fun beginning for this cross over event and for the first time in recent memory actually has me interested in a cross over event. Rating: 7/10

 

 

Tales From The Pull List (01/06/2016): My Spidey Sense is tingling

Hello Revuers! It’s the first Tales from the Pull List of the year! It’s hard to believe how quickly last year flew by. 2015 was a year of great comics and I hope that 2016 continues the greatness. If this weeks pull list is any indication then I’m not worried at all.

 

Pick of the Week

Spidey #2: This series sees the return of Peter Parker to high school. Writer Robbie Thompson does a great job of making this step back actually feel like a step forward. With old faces seeming fresh and old story’s seeming new. In this issue we see Spidey in a fight with Sandman and a tutoring session with Gwen Stacey (Stacey rules Mary Jane drooles). At the beginning of the issue we see Peter talking to Aunt May about his upcoming tutoring session and she tells him to “Just be yourself” which leaves our hero to ponder “Which version of myself” At first all the versions of himself seem bad, as like with most teenagers, he struggles with self-esteem. Spidey slowly realizes over the course of the issue that in the right situations all the things he thinks are bad about himself (nerdy, geeky, etc.) are actually strengths (except for being broke, that’s not a strength). This realization gives him confidence (and the inner monologue that works though this gives the reader plenty of opportunity for laugh out loud funny moments). Not only that but he finds out that his secret crush knows who Gandalf is, so…..that’s a win. The art by Nick Bradshaw is beyond perfect for this series. His version of the Sandman is perhaps the best I’ve ever seen. All in all Spidey is a fresh and fun take on Spider-Man that the other more dramatic Spider-Man (Amazing) is missing. Rating: 10/10

Buy

Doctor Strange #4: What grave peril is threatening the Sorcerer Supreme of all the dimensions? What can kill magic and old books? What’s the Chloric intake that Doctor Strange needs to command the mystical? All these questions are pondered in the fourth issue of this fantastic series (ok, maybe not that last one). Jason Aaron and Chris Bachalo gift the reader another action pact and visually stunning book. If you aren’t reading this series you really have to ask yourself why? Rating: 8/10

Invincible Iron Man #5: This issue continues where number four left off. A stand down between Iron Man Madame Masque…….and Doom? That’s right Victor appears to be on Tony’s side in this one. Although appearances aren’t to be trusted. Speaking of appearances, I wonder what caused the appearance change for Doom? Perhaps something from the end of Secret Wars? Rating: 8/10

Amazing Spider-Man #6: The other Spider-Man title that was released this week saw Peter Parker doing more Tony Stark things half way across the world. Be that as it may the return of a surprise villain and an interesting appearance of a fabled team of super heroes made this book interesting to read. Although a bit heavy for what I like in a Spider-Man book. Rating: 6/10

 

Our 50th post: A nostalgia filled trip down memory lane

Hello Revuers, I’m proud to announce that this is our 50th post on Deja.Revue! When I started this site with my roommate back in November of 2014 I couldn’t have anticipated the great response and support from viewers like you. Thanks to die hard comics fan like us, we have grown exponentially over the course of ten months. I could ramble on and on with statistics and numbers and blah blah blah…….but I’d rather just bring you the high quality original content you’ve come to expect from us. Since I’m feeling reminiscent I’ve asked our writers and our guest reviewers to write about their most nostalgic issue or series from their childhood. I’m happy to report that this article turned out to be one of my favorite and I hope its yours too. As usual all names are clickable and you should check out our guest bloggers sites. They are all wonderful. Now, without further delay lets begin our nostalgia filled joyride through our childhoods.

Jerry Caskey

Associate Writer of Deja.Revue


Cloak and Dagger (1­-4)1983
Cloak and Dagger are the most basic opposites, light and dark. This is a common trope, and a simple but solid premise that allows the reader to accept these new characters without bogging down the story with exposition. As the story advances, the characters become more nuanced and interesting. Cloak is darkness. He must feed on the light of humanity to satisfy his cravings or suffer the maddening effects of hunger. If he does not feed, he will begin to consume his own humanity. Where Cloak is darkness and retribution, Dagger is light and forgiveness. She produces pure humanity in the form of daggers. These light daggers act as a jump start to give a person a chance to redeem themselves before Cloak enacts his more permanent form of justice. However, Dagger’s light is limited and thus can not redeem those too far gone nor can it totally satisfy Cloak’s hunger. In addition to seeking out the wicked, Cloak and Dagger must confront their own personal demons. In issue two, Dagger confronts a man whom she slaps across the room and states “My light knives are too good to waste on the likes of you!”. In retrospect she realizes that she acted without compassion. She must learn to control her emotions to give every person equal opportunity for redemption. Cloak begins to perceive himself as a burden on Dagger, causing him to spiral into a state of self­loathing and harm. Eventually banishing himself to the sewers in an attempt to not affect anyone instead of realizing the potential for good that he possesses. So enough about the series, why do I love it so much? Well let me tell you… Cloak is a badass. He is troubled and dark, and essentially everything he says is the basis of a death metal song. For example: “You have chosen your fate, scum of the street. Darkness seeks darkness. Let you soul now scream – as is greets a darkness greater than its own.” “I am shadow. I darkness deeper than any dungeon. I am called Cloak… and I hunger.” “There is only one law, detective, as this murderer of women and children shall soon discover… the law of retribution.” “I am not a man, detective. I am merely a being who exists from one day to the next – locked in a struggle between hunger and appeasing that hunger. But I have learned that if I am ever to again be a man – that hunger must be denied!” But his darkness dissipates in the presence of Dagger’s light. Both Cloak and Dagger deal with issues that I see in myself. The whole series provokes the idea that neither light, nor dark is the answer the the issues of humanity. Rather, it is a balance of good and evil.

Jaythreadbear

Hasty scribbler on comics and culture


Batman: The Long Halloween #1

When I was a much younger geek I followed my older brother into reading comics; my pull list consisting mostly of random Superman stories and Chris Claremont’s sub-X-Men for DC Sovereign Seven. At some point my brother quit comics in spectacular fashion selling off most of his collection and giving away the rest. One book that I was able to salvage from the flames was Batman: The Long Halloween #1. For some reason unknown to me even now it would be another few years until I actually read the thing, but boy when I did was my mind blown. Here was a comic that showed me what comics could really do; that amongst the kapow-action there could be smart plots and shocking surprises, and it could all be delivered with the perfect grace of Tim Sale’s elegant art.

In retrospect it is probably that gorgeous Sale artwork that does a lot of the heavy lifting on an issue by issue basis, keeping things flowing and providing a sublime canvas on which the story is drawn, but I wouldn’t want to do writer Jeph Loeb out of some well-deserved credit either. Sure, when reading the book again the strange choices and dubious pacing are a little more obvious (mostly due to the villain-an-issue structure), but there is still an intrinsic magic to the concept and plot. This is a vision of Batman’s early career that picks up on the oft-quoted but very rarely shown fact that Batman is allegedly the world’s greatest detective and runs with it all the way to the goal line. There are clues and red herrings and mis-directions and it all comes together with a perfectly satisfying conclusion by the time the story is done.

Seeing the last three ‘good’ men in Gotham (Jim Gordon, Harvey Dent, and Batman) come together to instill law, justice, and order makes for a wonderful story and it’s perhaps not surprising that the best Batman movie is built on the same foundation. Speaking of films it is probably fair to say that this is the greatest Godfather comic book out there too, as it draws heavily on the Coppola film visually and the Puzo novel narratively. Again the concept shines through with a unique take on the superhero genre as Loeb takes the decision to examine the fall of traditional crime in Chicago-inspired Gotham as clown princes and other such masked super villains take over the city.

After reading that first issue I was hooked and many anxious shopping trips at local comics fairs and back issue parlours followed. It took me a while to pick up every part of The Long Halloween, but it was well worth all of the searching. Tim Sale has continued to deliver amazing work since then, but the Loeb/Sale partnership never yielded anything quite so perfectly formed (even the sequel Dark Victory lacks a certain something) and I think this would probably be my choice for best Batman story too. For me it remains the quintessential tale of the dark knight; it demonstrates his detective skills as well as his physical prowess, it features his greatest allies and most dangerous villains, it paints a vivid picture of Gotham as a living place and more than just the backdrop to random adventures, and overall it makes for a compelling and beautiful read. Even after all these years and all the comics since this is still how I see the Batman, and for that I am very grateful to Tim Sale and Jeph Loeb.

The burning blogger of Bedlam


Fatal Attractions

When Andrew invited me to do this piece, my first thought was ‘oh,
this is going to be hard to pick’. But then my second thought was ‘oh
wait, no it isn’t!’

Because probably the comic book ‘event’ that has the most sentimental
attachment for me and that also ensured my lifelong status as a
comic-book reader was an event called ‘Fatal Attractions’ in 1993,
which briefly crossed over all the X-Men titles of the time. I had
been reading comics a couple of years by then, and in fact the first
comic-book event that really had been a big deal to me was the
legendary Claremont/Lee ‘X-Men: Mutant Genesis’ storyline from two
years earlier – which would be regarded as the prequel to ‘Fatal
Attractions’. Released in 1991, that had been the event that had
relaunched the entire X-Men mythology and ensured that the X-Men would
become a multi-media sensation and cultural phenomenon in the 1990s
and beyond. That story, which was at the time the farewell masterpiece
of Chris Claremont (who had been so important to the X-Men for so many
years) not only breathed new life into the X-Men but also established
Magneto as the most complex, fascinating ‘villain’ in Marvel Comics.

These first three issues of the then new ‘X-Men’ title told the story
of a reclusive and somewhat retired Magneto being reluctantly drawn
back into the mutant crisis on Earth and once again coming into
conflict with Charles Xavier and the X-Men (after years of having been
‘on the good side’). The story remains probably the greatest ever
exploration of that crucial Magneto/Xavier dynamic that for so long
epitmosed the X-Men mythology, and it all builds to its epic climaxe
in X-Men #3 where Magneto is betrayed and killed by one of his own and
Professor X can only look on helplessly as his friend dies. Both as
the beginning of a new X-Men era and as the sign-off for Chris
Claremont, this was the absolutely perfect story and event. But then
two years later, Magneto ‘returned’ from death (note: he wasn’t
technically dead, it turned out) and we got an even more epic story
and Shakespearean tragedy with ‘Fatal Attractions’.

Even though I’d read some ‘crossover’ events already by then
(Operation Galactic Storm, the Infinity War, etc), there was nothing
that blew away my 13-year-old self more than this X-Men event did.
Crossing Excalibur #71, X-Factor #92, X-Force #25, Uncanny X-Men #304,
X-Men #25 and Wolveirne #75, this storyline set the bar up to a whole
new level. Dealing centrally with the return of Magneto, these comics
were an obsession to me for years. The writing, the character work,
the dynamics, it was all epic.

There were so many unforgettable moments; the funeral of Illyana
Rasputin, the emergence of the character ‘Exodus’, the epic
confrontatino between Magneto and Cable, the defection of Colossus to
Magneto’s side, and of course everything culminating in that
unforgettable showdown between Charles and Magneto in X-Men #25, with
Wolverine getting the adamantium brutally ripped from his body and
Charles breaking all of his ethical codes by psychically assaulting
Magneto and leaving him a braindead vegetable. It was – and still is –
utterly gripping stuff, full of poetry and resonance, as if some great
literary figure was suddenly writing X-Men comics. And godammit, those
bad-ass holograms on each of the covers still hypnotise me every time
I look at them, even twenty years later! The Havok hologram for
X-Factor #92 has to be seen to be believed!

I was about 13 when these comics came out, but I still go weak at the
knees every time I come across them in my old collection. I must’ve
read these issues over the years about as many times as I’ve watched
Empire Stikes Back or Return of the Jedi. They’re that good.

Meta Desi

https://www.facebook.com/meta.desi.comics

https://www.facebook.com/scribblinakshay


G.I. Joe A Real American Hero #21 (“Silent Interlude”)

I2621479-gi_joe__1982_marvel__21 used to own a copy of this comic and to this day one of my biggest regrets is that I loaned it to a kid I knew and never saw it again.
Written by the legendary Larry Hama who crafted pretty much the entire series of over a hundred and fifty of these books for Marvel and ended up creating some of the most intriguing and definitely ahead of their time (and comic-medium) stories for what was meant to be just an add-on to a toy-line, this book is a prime example of what Hama and Marvel accomplished.
Simply put, this is a comic that has no dialogue.
None. Nada. Zip. Zero.
It starts off with Snake-Eyes (arguably either the coolest or most over-rated Joe ever) silently infiltrating a Cobra fortress in an attempt to rescue his comrade and beloved Scarlett. Meanwhile, in keeping with the less sexist tone of much of the series, Scarlett herself is busy extricating herself from the inside out quite capable – something that seems like nothing special until one considers how such things influence our minds as children and eventually as adults.

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Each page was filled with tension and I would be on the edge of my seat each time I read this comic, devouring the artwork on each page as he made his way through, silently taking out guards and even facing down and defeating Storm-Shadow and his ninja’s before making an explosive exit with his target acquired.
I had read none of the other comics and came to possess this in the late 80’s as a little tyke, purely by chance and knew the Joe’s only through the less intense/hard-edged cartoon series. Within these pages though I found a level of intelligent, well thought out and engaging story-telling that would never have been expected and the lack of dialogue and using visuals is a concept that has burned itself into my mind to this day with thus far two of my own published comics being in a similar vein (sans dialogue) and must I admit that until making this list I never truly realised where that interest in purely visual story-telling had been born.