Deja.Revue Review Episode 1

Hello Revuers, episode 1 of our new podcast, Deja.Revue Review, is live on Soundcloud. That will be our temporary host until we make the move to iTunes. In  this episode we talked about San Diego Comic Con and the trailers that dropped. We also discussed X-men, Defenders, CBS All-Access, Star Trek, and the sustainability of the Superhero genre. Please check it out and give us some feedback. We would like to know your thought on it and what you liked and didn’t like. Below is the link:

 

If you liked the episode then please subscribe!

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Meet the Press

Hello Revuers! I have breaking news. Our very own Andrew Horton will be at Cincinnati Comic Con on September 12th and 13th.  If you’ve been dying to meet one of the writers behind (hopefully) your favorite comic book blog now is your chance. Andrew will wearing a press pass with Deja.Revue printed on it. Also if you need any more motivation the list of comic creators who will be in attendance is astounding: Cameron Stewart, Brendan Fletcher, Tony Moore, Phil Noto, Brian Ewing, Bill Willingham, Cullen Bunn, Rick Remender, Raw Fawkes…… The list goes on and on. Truly the amount of comic talent they have assembled is staggering. Especially for the very modest ticket cost of $21 for a day pass and $35 for a weekend pass. So if you want to come meet Andrew and talk comics or life for awhile, all while meeting some of the best creators in the game, then go to Cincinnati Comic Con. Here’s a link:

http://www.cincycomicon.com/Welcome.html

Tales From the Pull List (Aug. 12th): We are living in a (Im)material world

Pick of the Week:

Phonogram: The Immaterial girl #1: So full disclosure: I own the first two volumes of Phonogam, and I have read them both numerous times. When I found out that they were making another volume of it I freaked out. I marked the day on my calender, and stared longingly at it. With this hype I had built, a worrisome thought crept into my mind: what if it didn’t live up to the hype I had created in my own head? What if the beauty of what it had been overshadowed what it will be. I am happy to report that it lived up to the hype I had created for it, and then some. The issue is a nostalgia filled roller coaster of emotion. Gillen’s script is so good that at times it hurts. The art by McKelvie and Wilson holds up to its standard of excellence and more.  Wilson has cemented (in my mind at least) his status of the best color artist in the game. Seriously, is there a better creative team than Gillen, McKelvie, and Wilson? I dare you try, I know you’ll fail. Go buy this issue.If you haven’t read the previous volumes of Phonogram you will still enjoy it. If you have you’ll enjoy it even more. Rating: 10/10

Buy

Injection #4: More of the back story is explored in this issue, but the answers are coupled with more questions. Ellis, Shalvey, and Bellaire craft an excellent issue with lots of character development. With more of the background being revealed you finally get a sense of what’s going on, and that in and of it’s self is exciting. Not as much action this issue as the bulk of it was dedicated to back story. An almost antithesis of issue three really. I’m excited to continue this series and see which bends first: Science, or magic. Rating: 7/10

Gotham Academy #9: Another strong showing for my favorite series from DC. Could there be a wolf at Gotham Academy? Or something more sinister? This issue builds on the mystery that surrounds Olive’s mother while providing plenty of action in the for of a man bat and a wolf man(?). We discover that certain people are excellent at science, and that they may or may not have a secret layer. The creative team of Cloonan, Fletcher, Kerschl, Lapointe, and Msassyk continue to deliver month after month. At this point if you aren’t reading Gotham Academy you might want to re-evaluate your life. Rating: 8/10

A-Force #3: She-hulk finds herself in the midst of trouble after jumping threw the portal from the end of issue two. Will she be able to make it back to her team? Whats the meaning of the portals? What’s causing them? All these questions are, more or less, answered in this issue. I’ll keep this mini review spoiler free though. A-Force continues to be a fresh air in what is starting to feel like an aimost-stale mega event. The only titles I read from Secret Wars is Secret Wars and this title. I am glad it’s continuing after Battleworld is no more. Rating: 7/10

Secret Wars #5: Speaking of Secret Wars, the main title continues to surprise me. I know I’ve said it before but Jonathan Hickman is a genius, or a mad scientist. One of the two. In this issues we see the repercussions of the shocking end to Issue 4 (no spoilers, just know that it was indeed shocking). We learn more of how God Doom was able to save what fragments of the muti-verse that he did save (with the helm\p of a very special someone). Truly the exploration of how battleworld came to be is fascinating to me. It’s clear that this event was months, no, years in the making. The art by Ribic continues to astound. All in all a great addition to a great series. Rating: 8/10

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Starfire #3: Honestly the only reason I got this issue is because I pre-ordered it months ago. I can see why other people like it, it’s just not for me. Rating: 3/10

Descender #6: This issue really fell flat for me. Which is a pity because I’ve really enjoyed the overall series. I hope that Jeff Lemire can turn it around for the next issue. Rating: 5/10

Tales from the pull list (Jul. 8th): A not so Civil, War

Hello revuers! What a good week for comics! Almost everything I picked up was fantastic, which made it difficult for me to decide my pick of the week. There were also sooooo many books that came out that I wanted that I had to put back  couple to wait until payday. There were several good Secret Wars titles as well and some Indie titles that really kicked butt. So lets jump right in on this massive New Comic Book Day!

Pick of the Week

Civil War #1: This story is written by Charles Soule with art from Leinil Francis Yu, Gerry Alanguilan, and Sunny Gho. The story picks up during the ending events of Marvels first Civil War event. Only this time instead of the war ending in the prison, there was an accident that further divided the two factions. This catastrophic event lead to the US being split into two sides The Iron (which is Tony Starks side), and the Blue (Captain Americas side). Not only are the two areas divided geographically (with Cap taking the West and Tony taking the East), but also philosophically. Tonys Iron side is a carefully planned and maintained state with everything having it’s place, and everything ruled very carefully, and Captain Americas side resembling something of an anarchy. The issue jumps some number of years ahead and the war has raged on and on and on. Miriam Sharpe has set up camp between the divide of the two regions and on this day is readying herself for the first negotiations between the two factions in forever. Then things go terribly wrong (don’t they always?). What I really liked about this issue was the world building done by the creative team. Soule wrote an intriguing script with great plot points and character building. The art by Yu, Alanguilan, and Gho really painted a bleak world on the verge of losing hope. I was beyond blown away by this issue and I can’t wait for #2. Rating: 9/10

Buy

Star Trek/Green Lantern: The Spectrum War: I purchased this comic for the sole reason of my love for Star trek. I’m not a huge Green Lantern fan, but the prospect of him and Captain Kirk interacting made it a compelling, if risky, purchase. Well, I am glad I took that risk. Fun story, and interesting build up. Not a ton happened in the issue as it served to build up the confrontation in the future, but to see the U.S.S. Enterprise surround by that green energy force field really was a sight to behold. Rating: 6.5/10

Star Wars: Lando #1: Growing up I was a huge Lando fan. So when I found out he was going to have his own series I fanboyed out a bit. This issue did not disappoint. The second issue on this list by Charles Soule, Lando #1 delivered all the typical hijinks you would expect from a Lando Book. There was romance, souve-ness, charm, action, danger, and double-cross, a double double-cross?!?, o and a stolen ship that was owned by the last person you’d want to steal a ship from. What has he got himself into this time? Rating: 7.5/10

Strange Fruit #1 of 4: Strange Fruit is a story of the racially charged Mississippi Delta during what looks like the 20s. The levee in a small town is over flowing and the white folk are expecting the black folk to work double time to fix it. There really aren’t any lovable characters in this series as even the people who are trying to help are doing it for the wrong reasons. The end had a real surprise to it and I won’t ruin it for you, but believe me: It’s big. The art by J.G.Jones is exceptional. They craft very unique looking individuals. You can tell a lot of work went into this series, and if the other three are as good as this one I’ll be happy. Rating: 7/10

Injection #3: Finally some background information so that w can figure out what’s going on! Ellis Shalvey and Bellaire ar one of my favorite creative teams, and so even though the first two issues were secretive and confusing I chose to stay with it. I am glad I did. It turns out this book is a genre bending sci-fi and magic book. With Magic being an outdated idea that still holds sway in a science heavy society. The art is fantastic as per usual and I have to say I got the variant cover and it’s amazing. Buy it if you can! Rating: 7/10

Gotham academy #8: So after last months filler (although still fun) issue, this months offering delves into the meat of the new story arc. Something is happening to the kids at Gotham Academy! There are Bats, and Grave yards, and Love, and awkwardness, and more Maps, and dialogue, and well, you get. Just go buy this issue and preorder everything you can. It’s gold, always has been and I see no reason for it to stop. Rating: 8/10

Descender #5: Here the bots and humes are taking to the planet Gnish to be destroyed in the pits. Well the robots anyways. It turns out that one of the humans may not be all that they appear to be? If you want to know the answer, go buy the book. Lemire does an excellent job of world building again as we are now on the third planet of this star spanning space epic. And he does it all within the course of one issue. The art is as it always is: extraordinary. If you aren’t buying this series you need to ask yourself why? Rating: 7/10

The Amazing Spider-Man: Renew Your Vows #2: The story picks up in a world controlled by Renegade, and the fearful Parkers trying desperately to conceal their powers. It turns out that the little Parker has some Amazing (too much?) abilities of her own. There are cameos by a couple of super powered groups which makes this issue more fun than it appeared to be at the beginning, and a change of costume for our lovable webhead. I am interested to see what role Venom has in this arc as there is a ton of foreshadowing in this issue. Rating: 6/10

1872 #1: This series transports the heroes of the Marvel Universe into the old West of America. And it’s as awesome as it sounds. Steve Rogers is sheriff of a corrupt town who’s mayor is Wilson Fisk. The governor of the region is Roxxon, so already you have a feeling for how corrupt this region is. Rogers wants nothing more than to end the corruption of Fisk and Roxxon, he is even willing to risk his life in the process. There are appearances from Bruce Banner (a tinkerer) and Tony Stark, with illusions to Matt Murdock (who is a lawyer of course), and a surprise villain (who was a perfect choice). I am so excited for issue two. Rating: 8.5/10

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Runaways #2: Boring, I couldn’t even get all the way through it. I am very disappointed in this series. I won’t be picking up any more of it.

Starfire #2: Got away from some of the humor that was the best thing about issue 1. The annoying headlines make the book feel convoluted and fractured. I won’t be buying anymore.

-Andrew Horton

Diversity in Comics

So I have felt some rumblings for awhile about the addition of diversity in comics. This includes any change in a persons race, gender, or sexuality. For this rant I’ll focus on Captain America being black, and Thor being a woman. Comics are an ever evolving and changing medium. Often the trends in society affect comics (and trends in comics affect society), the effect of this has led to a more diverse cast of characters. To this I say good. Before female Thor I had no interest in reading Thor. He came across as a hulking brute (admittedly with beautiful hair), who liked to smash things with a hammer…..bor-ing. The addition of a now female Thor has led to a more nuanced character with several levels of personality. Shes funny, witty, intriguing, and still kicks butt. Overall a large improvement on old Odinson. As for Captain America, Steve Rogers is like a billion years old and he decided to retire and pass his mantle on to some one else. That someone happened to be Sam Wilson (formerly the Falcon), who also just happens to be black. Whats the big deal!? Sam was a sidekick of Caps and a close friend. It makes perfect sense for him to step into that role. So I have no problems with it.

black-captain-america

The second thing that makes me mad is when people say “You have to uphold the integrity of the creators characters”. When utilizing this argument you have to realize the context in which the characters were created. The two listed up above were created between the 40s’60s. That era in Americas history was much more close minded about diversity than we are today. So even if the creators had wanted to put a black person as, say, Captain America, there’s no way that would have been published. Society then was going through such a shake up, and the powers at be would never have let that happen. We are in a much better place now, for comics to more properly reflect the true diversity of America than we were then.

Another argument people use (which usually is a thinly veiled attempt to not appear racist) is “Why don’t they just make new ethnic characters?” The answer is they are. You can look to the big two and see some expanding of diversity in new characters (Ms. Marvel, Silk, etc.). Where the big explosion really is is in the indie market. Companies such as Image, Boom!, and Dark Horse just to name a few, really put out great works with a large amount of diversity. Often these series are creator owned (meaning the are created by the writers and artist, and they maintain the rights to the characters). This lends some credibility to the idea that when given the opportunity to work with a more diverse palette, creators often will. Which would seem to validate my last point

I guess to sum it up: Stop complaining and enjoy this era of comics we are in. There’s much more diversity, which leads to more interesting and layered story telling, and fresh new and exciting characters. Society, like comics, is not static. Its dynamic. Ever evolving ever changing. I think our comics should be the same.