Deja.Revue Review Episode 1

Hello Revuers, episode 1 of our new podcast, Deja.Revue Review, is live on Soundcloud. That will be our temporary host until we make the move to iTunes. In  this episode we talked about San Diego Comic Con and the trailers that dropped. We also discussed X-men, Defenders, CBS All-Access, Star Trek, and the sustainability of the Superhero genre. Please check it out and give us some feedback. We would like to know your thought on it and what you liked and didn’t like. Below is the link:

 

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Meet The Press

Hello Revuers! This weekend I will be attending Indy Pop Con as a member of the press! What is Pop Con you ask?: “PopCon was founded to celebrate all aspects of pop culture, rather than just hyper focusing on a specific genre. We have a wide variety of interests – just like our fans – so we created a con to celebrate them all in one awesome weekend!”. Just like their website suggests they have a wide range of guests from many different genres. Including: Comics, TV, Cosplay, Youtube, Gaming, Art, and Wrestling! I’ve never covered Pop Con before so I am looking forward to the experience. My main targets for the weekend include Mark Waid, and Ronald Wimberly, but I am going in with an open mind! If you happen to be in Indy and you see a slightly chubby 5’11 male with brown hair and glasses (that are probably to big) feel free to stop me and say hello! (I’ll also be wearing a lanyard that says Deja.Revue). I’d love to meet fans in real life! If you aren’t attending Pop Con this weekend then WHY NOT!?!?!?!? There’s still time to purchase a TICKET.

Tales From the Pull list (Jan. 27th): Rebs running wild again

Hell Revuers. This week was a lighter week for me with only three books coming out that were on my pull list. That being said the three that I ended up with were all great. It was a close race for pick of the week but in the end the old tried and true team of the Jason’s (Aaron and Latour) won it. Without further delay here is my Tales from the Pull list

Pick Of The Week

Southern Bastards #13: Everything about this issue was a win for me. On the surface it was a simple tale of a homecoming football game, but on  deeper level it was about what it means to be a REB. Fight, determination, and a whole lot of language. The issues dives in after the suicide of Boss’ closest confidant and companion (because the Jason’s like to kill everyone we like). It’s homecoming and the REBs are down, for the first time in a long time. The pressure is on Boss like it’s never been, Can he handle it without his most trusted ally, can he inspire the boys to come back from a 20-3 deficit at half time? Well if you want to find out, go buy the book. The art continues a strong showing from Jason Latour. Who also colors the book. The colors that are used are all earth tones with varying shades of red, brown, grey, and some muted green thrown in. The colors really establish just what kind of place Craw County really is and sets the tone for the issue (and the series as a whole). The cover art is really what stands out. The earth tones I spoke of earlier have always been featured in the covers. Always muted and earth toned. This issue the cover is sky blue, which happens to be the color of the Runnin’ Rebs arch rival the Wetumpka Warriors (who they are facing during the home coming game). Could this cover be an indication of what is to come? Maybe…….Rating: 8.5/10

 

BUY

Cry Havoc: The marketing has stated that this series is “It’s not abut a lesbian werewolf going to war except it kind of is”. It turns out that that is exactly what it is. Sorta. The story is set in three different time periods: The Beginning, The middle, and The End. This is emphasized by having three different colorist coloring the three different sections. Not only does it have three separate colorist, all three of them happen to be elite colorists (Nick Filardi, Lee Loughridge, and Matt Wilson). This device helps the reader stay immersed in the story and helps them understand what section they are currently reading. Without this device Cry Havoc would be confusing and frustrating. With this device it turned into a surprise enjoyment and an intriguing mystery.

All-New All-Different Avengers #4: This was a simple filler issue that served to do some character building. Being as that’s what it was it was successful. The last mini arch was so action filled it was hard to get a sense of what the team was and how it would function. After this issue it’s more clear what roles each of the members play. Plus the added a layer of secrecy that could be the driving point of the next arch. Overall a successful, if slightly dull, issue. Rating: 6/10

Tales From The Pull List (01/06/2016): My Spidey Sense is tingling

Hello Revuers! It’s the first Tales from the Pull List of the year! It’s hard to believe how quickly last year flew by. 2015 was a year of great comics and I hope that 2016 continues the greatness. If this weeks pull list is any indication then I’m not worried at all.

 

Pick of the Week

Spidey #2: This series sees the return of Peter Parker to high school. Writer Robbie Thompson does a great job of making this step back actually feel like a step forward. With old faces seeming fresh and old story’s seeming new. In this issue we see Spidey in a fight with Sandman and a tutoring session with Gwen Stacey (Stacey rules Mary Jane drooles). At the beginning of the issue we see Peter talking to Aunt May about his upcoming tutoring session and she tells him to “Just be yourself” which leaves our hero to ponder “Which version of myself” At first all the versions of himself seem bad, as like with most teenagers, he struggles with self-esteem. Spidey slowly realizes over the course of the issue that in the right situations all the things he thinks are bad about himself (nerdy, geeky, etc.) are actually strengths (except for being broke, that’s not a strength). This realization gives him confidence (and the inner monologue that works though this gives the reader plenty of opportunity for laugh out loud funny moments). Not only that but he finds out that his secret crush knows who Gandalf is, so…..that’s a win. The art by Nick Bradshaw is beyond perfect for this series. His version of the Sandman is perhaps the best I’ve ever seen. All in all Spidey is a fresh and fun take on Spider-Man that the other more dramatic Spider-Man (Amazing) is missing. Rating: 10/10

Buy

Doctor Strange #4: What grave peril is threatening the Sorcerer Supreme of all the dimensions? What can kill magic and old books? What’s the Chloric intake that Doctor Strange needs to command the mystical? All these questions are pondered in the fourth issue of this fantastic series (ok, maybe not that last one). Jason Aaron and Chris Bachalo gift the reader another action pact and visually stunning book. If you aren’t reading this series you really have to ask yourself why? Rating: 8/10

Invincible Iron Man #5: This issue continues where number four left off. A stand down between Iron Man Madame Masque…….and Doom? That’s right Victor appears to be on Tony’s side in this one. Although appearances aren’t to be trusted. Speaking of appearances, I wonder what caused the appearance change for Doom? Perhaps something from the end of Secret Wars? Rating: 8/10

Amazing Spider-Man #6: The other Spider-Man title that was released this week saw Peter Parker doing more Tony Stark things half way across the world. Be that as it may the return of a surprise villain and an interesting appearance of a fabled team of super heroes made this book interesting to read. Although a bit heavy for what I like in a Spider-Man book. Rating: 6/10

 

End of the Year Top 10 List from Deja.Revue and Friends

Hello Revuers! Hard to believe it’s that time of the year again. 2015 has just flown by! It proved to be a fantastic year for comics. With so many great series it was hard to limit it to just 5 or 10. So I asked some of our friends of Deja.Revue to help me, by picking their favorite series’ as well. The contributors names will be centered and emboldened. When applicable it will also be a hyperlink so that you can check out their blog. I highly recommend that you do as the contributors to this article are all top notch. So with out further ado, here are the top comics of 2015.

Andrew Horton

Head Writer: Deja.Revue

10. Spider-Gwen, Publisher: Marvel, Writer Jason Latour Art: Robbi Rodriguez, Color Art: Rico Renzi.

Spider-Gwen suffered from to many reboots in to short of time. First they had their first issue then less that a year later it was back to a new issue one. This wasn’t the creative teams fault and they did the best they could to salvage what they could from the situation. The post Secret Wars have been great so far and I think that next year this title could be much higher on this list.

9. Dr. Strange, Publisher: Marvel, Writer Jason Aaron, Art: Chris Bachalo

With Dr Strange coming to cinemas next fall a post Secret Wars universe seemed like a great opportunity to launch a new solo series for our Sorcerer Supreme. Luckily for Marvel they hired writer supreme Jason Aaron, who can do almost no wrong. I picked up the first issue and feel completely under it’s spell (to much? Okay okay no more terrible puns).  The art by Chris Bachelo really gives us a glimpse of the oddness and absurdity of the world in which Dr. Strange lives. Overall a spectacular job!

8. Invincible Iron Man, Publisher: Marvel, Writer: Brian Michael Bendis, Art: David Marquez

The creative team behind Ultimate Spider-Man team up again to bring a normal Iron Man back to a solo adventure (by normal I mean not a “Superior” Axis influenced Iron Man, He’s still a billionaire playboy). This series sees an exciting shift of the status quo for one of Marvel’s biggest villains (no spoilers) and a quite compelling story line. O also a night beach fight with sword wielding ninjas (yeah, it’s as awesome as it sounds). The writing is the nest by Bendis in quite awhile and the art is amazingly well done.

7. Silver Surfer, Publisher: Marvel, Writer: Dan Slott, Artist: Michael and Laura Allred.

Enough can never be said about the fantastic art by the Allreds on this series. They truly take it from being a good comic to being a great comic. That being said I was happy to see how the events of this series influenced Secret Wars.  Made the series fun to read as a companion piece to Hickman’s saga. I can’t wait until it starts back up!

6. Thor/The Mighty Thor, Publisher: Marvel, Writer: Jason Aaron Art: Russel Daughterman, Color Art: Matthew Wilson

The first volume of a Female Thor was cut short by Secret Wars. That doesn’t mean it wasn’t good. In fact it was spectacular. Jane Foster added a depth to the character of Thor that was so fun to read. Now that we can focus our main attention on the story and less on who is Thor I feel like the title will get even stronger. If the first two issues are anything to go by I might be correct. Now that the story tellers can do some character building with Jane they are taking full advantage. The opening scene of issue one was a tear jerking emotional roller coaster. The play between the power of a God and the frailty of the human condition is really what makes this series so compelling.

5. Injection, Publisher: Image, Writer: Warren Ellis, Art Declan Shalvey, Color Art: Jordie Bellaire

The creative team behind the magnificent first volume of last years Moon Knight returns. This time with a slow burning supernatural drama that left the readers with more questions than answers for much of the first arc. This lead to a fantastic payoff that was a thrill ride in of itself. The writing is solid, but really the art is the stand out. The team of Shalvey and Bellaire work so well together and really compliment each others style. I hope they work on more books together in the future.

4. Gotham Academy, Publisher: DC, Writer: Brenden Fletcher and Becky Cloonan, Art: Karl Kerschl

The first and only DC title to make my list. It had a bit of a break during DCs Convergence event and just started up again. Still the story telling alone is worthy of the number 3 spot on this list. Cloonan and Fletcher take a rag tag group of kids and turn them into lovable characters that you genuinely feel a connection to (esp. maps). The art is excellent as well, with a heavy digital design and a slight manga influence. the next arc looks to be just as good if not better than the last.

3. Tokyo Ghost, Publisher: Image, Writer: Rick Remender, Art: Sean Murphy, Color Art: Matt Hollingsworth

Tokyo Ghost is a hauntingly gruesome look into (possibly our) the future. It asks the question what happens if we never have to look away from our screens? It questions society’s reliance on technology and what the repercussions of that reliance may be. Especially in relation to the children who grow up in this society. Tokyo Ghost has the most eerie and haunting line I have read this year (heck maybe ever) at the end of issue one.

2. The Wicked + The Divine, Publisher: Image, Writer: Kieron Gillen Art: Jamie McKelvie, Color Art: Matthew Wilson

I really struggled with the top two. Which is funny because the couldn’t be less similar. TWTD is, on the surface, a story of Gods and men and the interactions between them. Beneath the surface it is a cunning social commentary of the way people treat Pop Stars and the emotional repercussions the “Gods” and the “common folk” alike. The art is beyond anything I’ve ever seen. The team of McKelvie and Wilson consistently bring innovative designs and fresh panel work. The coloring is an art in and of it’s self. If you took any of the elements by themselves (story telling, art, colors) they would be fantastic, but this is one case where the whole is greater than the sum of its parts.

1. Southern Bastards, Publisher: Image, Writer: Jason Aaron + Jason Latour, Art: Jason Latour

Southern Bastards was my pick at six months and it is still my pick at the end of the year. Such fantastic story telling and art. Rough and tumble pages spilling forth gritty takes on a (slightly) exaggerated South. Jason Aaron and Jason Latour have crafted a masterpiece. Its that simple. They consistently toy with the emotions of the reader and in that regard show us that living is a messy thing and hardly anything is as simple as it appears. Except Ribs. Ribs are simple.

Andy Eschenbach

Comic Book Author and Tattoo Specialist

Top 10 comics of 2015 by Andy Eschenbach Wow! Twenty-Fifteen! Nice job, everybody! Except you. Yeah, you:) Comics is in such a great state right now. That said, it wasn’t hard to figure out which ten books I was most excited to pick up and read each beautiful Wednesday. And so it goes:

10. Joe Golem: Occult Detective (Dark Horse) – Mignola and Golden give us an intriguing combination of pulpy crime and Hebrew mythos. The environment, a sunken Manhattan, is appropriately depicted by the tough-looking art of Patric Reynolds, and stylish palette of Dave Stewart. Palumbo’s pulp-novel covers drive it right off the rack, too. This mini-series makes me want to dive right into it’s predecessor- a graphic novel unknown to me prior- just as much as I anticipate it’s next few issues. I WAS highly offended at the treatment of Witches throughout the story so far, as I personally practice Wizardry on a daily basis. HAHA! No I wasn’t! Less Witches= more magical power all for me! HAHAHAA! Kill ‘em, Golem!

9. Island Magazine (Image): Go ahead and get mad that I’m not going to mention every person involved in this book- but your time would be better spent reading. Any one of the creators in the past four issues of Island has made something strange and awesome, and more than worth your time. It’s also great to see a regularly-scheduled anthologystyle book on the shelves! What a great way to showcase talented folks and their work! More of this, please!

8. Tet (IDW): A dark human drama/mystery surrounding a group of people bound by events taking place during the Vietnam War, brought to us by Paul Allor and Paul Tucker, that is most certainly worth your attention. Not many stories that share setting or subject deal with it in such a smart or emotional way. It’s compelling and heartfelt, realistic to motives as much as to history, and supported by simplychiseled art. Really good. Really hard. Real.

7. Mythic (Image):  Phil Hester is my new hero. What a gift to Comics: a book that combines an American sense of humor to a theme of Myth and Magic- something more often tackled, with such a skill level, by European writers. Duly brought to life by the sharp, intense art of John McCrea and refreshingly simple-yet-poppy colors of Michael Spicer, this book simultaneously brings back everything good about old-school Vertigo-style stuff, with none of the garbage, while presenting characters and jokes you have never seen or heard before. The funny thing is, they’ve been here all along, in our own histories and fables.

6. Invisible Republic (Image): Gabriel Hardman. Corrina Bechko. Jordan Boyd. Perfect. Gritty and grim, immersive and convincing, politically
poignant, and beautifully executed. Give this first arc a read, and find out about the lies people perpetuate- the truths they inhibit- to reach or maintain power. In space. Stories like these help remind us  that true history isn’t always the commonly accepted one.

5. We Can Never Go Home (Black Mask Studios): Punkrock runaway story? With Super-Powers?! Fuck yes! 🙂 I mean… whatever, man 😐 Great characterization by Matthew Rosenberg and Patrick Kindlon- the kind that really captures those moments, from awkward to awesome, that defined us in our salad days- as they weave us through an explosive gauntlet of violent reaction, tense uncertainty, and knee-jerk decision making in true Comic Book fashion. Josh Hood’s illustrations are just the right thing, too, along with Tyler Boss’s colors, providing the action and clarity to move the story forward in a smooth and exciting way. And there’s a bonus hit from Brian Level in the back five pages of the fifth issue! I’m stoked to see this continue! Good stuff, Black Mask Studios!

4. The Violent (Image): “Whut?! He put a book with only one issue out in his Top 4?!” Yeah. It’s that good. Perfect Crime by Ed Brisson, Adam Gorham, and Michael Garland. It’s moody and raw, and it’ll get your gut more than once in the first 22 pages. Don’t read any spoilers. Just go buy it.

3. Paper Girls (Image): It’s refreshing to read a book that seems to have no overt intentions of becoming a movie, as far as approach goes, but still imbues the qualities of those great pre-teen adventure films from the 80’s. Vaughn serves up all the delicious fun and excitement from the Goonies or Stand By Me rolled around in a mysterious sci-fi breading, beautifully presented by Cliff Chiang and Matt Wilson with bold and simple excellence. For all it’s movie-like charm, it presents outlandish events in a way that seems fluidly plausible, due to the perfect capturing of the feel of the era. Grab your Walkman, get on your bike, ride to the Comics Shop, pick up Paper Girls, and sneak a smoke in the back alley with your angsty friends while you read it.

2. The Vision (Marvel): I was massively excited to find out that my favorite Avenger was getting a solo book, and, although I was unfamiliar with the team’s work prior, I will now be finding more things to read by Tom King, and look at by Gabriel Hernandez Walta. The Vision is an eerie tale designed with plenty of social critique and suburban strangeness. Kings writing has a unique way of forging gut-wrenching emotional sympathy towards replicant human characters. Walta’s art is beautiful, and follows suit with King’s style by perfectly presenting the Vision family over a homogenized landscape, with moments of action and excitement sprinkled in. Jordie Bellaire’s colors are the icing, lending picture perfect hues and gorgeous rendering to each scene. I heard a critique that a story like this couldn’t last for more than a handful of issues. Who cares?! If
Marvels’s going to put out mini-series of this caliber, then so be it! I’d lay wages on a bet that this team could deliver for as long as necessary, though- and have high hopes that they will be given the chance.

1. Tokyo Ghost (Image): With Tokyo Ghost, Rick Remender hits me in all the same soft spots he did with his famed Uncanny X-force run, but from all different angles. Sci-Fi Action and Ultra Violence, Love, Hate, Sex, Depression, Addiction- all properly tailored in to the story with pertinence and excitement. Sean Murphy’s art is the best possible thing for this “tech-addicted dystopian” society, edgy and clear, with just enough manga influence to bring out the neo-japanese aspects of the world. It’s great to see that Matt Hollingsworth can truly do Murphy justice with his colors, as well. The overall effect is a presentation of human motives and drives so true that it hurts, amazingly believable considering the fantastical setting their pitted against. I can’t wait to read more!  It would be wrong not to mention (although I’m not sure if they technically happened this year or last) “Rasputin” by Alex Grecian and Riley Rossmo, and “Blast Furnace” by Ryan Browne. The first run on both were new to me in 2015, and both have continued into this year in work that I have yet to read, but would unabashedly force into anyone’s hands given proper opportunity. Oh yeah- and I don’t care what anyone says- the Amazing Spider-Man is still super-cool! On that note, here’s to a new year, and even better Comics! HOORAY!!

Jerry Caskey

Associate Writer: Deja.Revue

 1. Providence

Alan Moore takes the original stories of Lovecraft, digests them, and skillfully transplants them into the framework of American history. Told as a series of segmented encounters, Moore skillfully glides through horror after horror to produce a canon of terror matched by none but Lovecraft himself. Moore is relentless in his quest to push the limits of his protagonist and to see how far the human mind will go to explain away what it can’t understand.

For an artist to stay out of writer Alan Moore’s way and let him narrate this story would have been sufficient. But that is not what Jacen Burrows does. The art throughout Providence is done with enough realism to create a sympathetic universe, but not so real that the supernatural cannot be accepted. In some cases Burrows’ art actually conveys critical information to the story (note the progression of the moon throughout issue #6) that would otherwise bog down the dialog.

Contrary perhaps to many other titles, or even comics in general, the coloring in Providence plays an important role in maintaining some semblance of sanity for the reader. The colors begin as one would expect for life in New York, but quickly deteriorate into drab almost sepia tones that convey the deteriorating mental state of Mr. Black. Through issues #5 and #6, the coloring of a panel also indicates whether some situation is reality or some perverted perception of reality. While less attentive coloring wouldn’t break this series, Juan Rodriguez does not let the opportunity pass to polish up an already gleaming work

2. Injection

Warren Ellis, Jordie Bellaire, and Declan Shalvey are quickly becoming a favorite of mine. The three riff off each other to create this story as a series of flashbacks mixed in with current events. As the story unfolds it is narrated by an enigmatic figure in the form of bright yellow boxes that starkly contrast the otherwise subdued pages. Ellis does not immediately reveal the identity of this mysterious narrator, which makes the moment of understanding that much more rewarding. In this Ellis ensures that the narrative is vibrant and never stays in one place for too long. This vibrant narrative is admittedly confusing at times and, without the colorful guidance of Bellaire, could quickly lose the reader. Shalvey comes in to create a sense of physical movement in each character as they move through breathtaking environments

3. Descender

To those familiar with Jeff Lemire’s previous independent works need no other reason to read Descender. Lemire presents TIM-21 as a relic of a time before the outlaw and subsequent holocaust of androids. The narrative strolls through uncertainty and self-reflection in the mind of an android who may hold the key to understanding these recent activities. Dustin Nguyen presents this odyssey in a watercolor fashion that truly conveys a sense of wonder. For a series so focused on introspection, Nguyen conveys emotion masterfully through movement and facial expressions. This may be the best true Sci-Fi series for a while.

4. Radioactive Spider-Gwen

Due to the unexpected success of 2015’s Spider-Gwen series, our spider clad heroine gets her third introduction of the year. Radioactive Spider-Gwen reiterates some of what we already know about Gwen to bring new readers up to speed. Some would say that an entire issue is too much recap, but Jason Latour drives the story along at a comfortable pace such that the slow start can be forgiven.

As usual, the art continues to awe and inspire. Robbi Rodriguez and Rico Renzi continue to leave their colorful mark on every page. Keeping up with the (surprising) amount of action Latour throws at them, Rodriguez and Renzi still invent new ways to present the story. We get a POV look at Gwen slinging her way through the city among smaller images of the same event to convey movement. Together they highlight small details that make re-reading this series as rewarding as ever.

5. They’re Not Like Us

In a world of worry, planning, and lies that exist only as thoughts in the minds of stranger, the curse of hearing these thoughts would get the best of most people. How can you silence the thoughts of everyone in the world? Eric Stephenson introduces us to Syd, a girl who has determined that the only way to make it stop is to kill herself. Simon Gane presents this world with dramatic and impactful art that enhances the narrative in some clever and unique ways that would be best un-spoiled. Bellaire follows up and gives a familiar feel to an otherwise unfamiliar world.

6. UFOlogy

Beneath it’s symbols and bright hues of pink and orange on faded blue and green backdrops, UFOlogy is a coming of age story with aliens. A genre that has established itself as legitimate since the days of E.T. and persisted through the likes of Super 8, Earth to Echo, etc. In spite of this, James Tynion and Matt Fox have managed to keep UFOlogy fresh and entertaining.

7. Divinity

Divinity is the third title in Valiant Entertainment’s “Valiant Next” series. Matt Kindt keeps a straight face for the first third of issue #1 as he tells a down to earth story of Cosmonaut Abram Adams’ progress through the Soviet space program. After this slow start, the story is moved forward very quickly, skipping years and continents to continually astonish the reader. The art team, Trevor Hairsine, Ryan Winn, and David Baron give the story a timeless quality. The shuttles and space suits are vaguely historical but heavily imagined. Although Hairsine seems to be a master of establishing shots, sometimes the expressions and close ups can fall flat. Do not let those moments deter you though. This is an entertaining and rewarding read.

8. No Mercy

 

Alex de Campi fully understands the idea of looming dread. He also has completely digested the idea of a “teenager”. To use almost every stereotype of teenager as one’s prtagonists is a bold move, but to do so without seeming pandering or tongue-in-cheek is amazing. De Campi utilizes the technique of cluing in the audience without making the characters aware of some looming demise to instill dread. Throughout the series, Carla Speed McNeil is one of the best artists I had never heard of. She presents characters who are full of live and expression, truly one of the best aspects of No Mercy.

9. Age of Reptiles

Ricardo Delgado is back! Age of Reptiles returns as a shining light for the (criminally underpopulated) genre of wordless storytelling. Needless to say, the art surrounding the journey of Spinosaurus aegyptiacus is awesome. The scenery is full of life and no space is wasted. The vibrant colors pop. The Dinosaurs are unique and barbaric. It’s easy to get lost in this rich world in an age long past our own, the age of reptiles!

10. Kaijumax

For a story about a maximum-security prison for the world’s Kaiju, Kaijumax is surprisingly serious. Zander Cannon brings to life a world where even the largest monsters have personal problems. Kaijumax is a pleasant read filled with genuinely interesting characters and bright cartoonist artwork. A real treat!

 

Kuliebear

Writer: House Of Flying Scalpels

 

1. Low

Remender has had another good year but it is Greg Tocchini that has made this book shine so incredibly. The story does not play out as you would expect but more like chapters that barely follow on from one another. But as each comic forms a unit of an overall story, they each have well-structured ideas and a character that truly suffers and transitions from beginning to end. The art is so unique and beautiful that what seems a little obscure becomes very familiar very quickly: just wonderful each and every time.

 

2. Ms Marvel

As a man of Indian descent I am very akin to Kamala and her heritage. This is the first time that I felt like a book was intimately related to me, and it feels very odd but amazing at the same time. Having gone through similar family turmoil, I fully appreciate the back-story at hand. But G Willow Wilson is expert at having a hero being effective and fearful at the same time, but overcome those odds to become amazing. Whether it is Miyazawa or Alphona on the art, as long as Herring is colouring, it feels very homely.

 

3. The Wicked + The Divine

The end of the original arc was devastating and quite upsetting as we lose yet another character, but the specialist single issues featuring guest artists were also incredible. The Tara issue saw Tula Lotay being emotional in an issue that was truly disturbing but also befitting of the story. I very much look forward to the rest of the story, but with a touch of trepidation.

 

4. Invisible Republic

The political machinations of this book are very well described and subtly revealed. The first arc was brilliant in its ability to start with a simple murder cover up but lead onto a story about how a dictator came to lead. That level of powerful story telling required a solid story but also an impressive artist that was capable of the gravity of the task. Hardman and Boyd are up to that task and create a guttural and intense society in need of repair.

 

5. Southern Bastards

It used to all be about Earl Tubb but that was a long time ago. Now we have seen the second arc pass with the tragedy of Euless Boss’ origin and also snap issues of other members of the community. These were very compelling and also terrifying tales of prominent members of that community and indicated how enough was soon to be enough. Earl Tubb’s death will not be for nothing as the Jason’s make for unmissable reading.

 

6. Rasputin

Riley Rossmo has a beautiful ability to produce emotive responses from Rasputin that depicted the turmoil and weight of his past. Both of Grecian’s arcs were fantastic in their story and brining together of a true story and yet a modern twist to a character that died many years ago. Utterly fantastic to look at and a joy to read.

 

7. Gotham Academy

As Ms Marvel delivers in a naïve yet enthusiastic way, Academy delivers in an exuberant and adventurous one. The writing is quite sweet and very akin to teenage life but it is the sense of wonder and exploration that this book captures, that makes it so fun to read. Kerschl and Msassyk deliver a stunning cell shaded effect to their work but it is fun and caricaturist for a teenage book.

 

8. Daredevil

I said a fond farewell to this book because Waid and Samnee produced their final issue. And what a run it was, ending with a finale that changed all we knew about Daredevil but they took him to a place where he belonged and was happy to go to. It made sense because they made it make sense and I loved every issue of it. His relationship with Kirsten and with Foggy developed in tune and his own insecurities brought out into the open. I shall miss this book dearly.

 

9. Mind MGMT

Matt Kindt has never produced a comic as good as this one. That is not a surprise given that he had full control of it and produced it month in, month out for years. The story progressed to a fantastic finale that was befitting of all the mystery and magical powers that we have seen since issue one. Meru was a beautiful central character that was worthy of the weight placed on her, and Kindt’s imprecise watercolours became the only way to tell this story.

 

10. Secret Wars

It seems wrong that Hickman’s books don’t feature higher on this list but it has been a slow year. Secret Wars has come and not gone but the Marvel universe has moved on around it. This is a problem but despite the tie-ins and the delays, it has generally been wonderful. The story has taken its classic slow twists and turns but the art is stunning. Each Ribic page will blow your mind in its depth and dexterity. It is a befitting end to Hickman’s run but we are still waiting for it.

 

Jaythreadbear

Writer at: Jaythreadbear

 

Here’s a list, in no particular order, of comic book runs that I have had a hell of a lot of fun reading this year; these are the ones for which I counted down days, constantly re-read previous issues, and told everyone I know to go buy them immediately:
They’re Not Like Us
This truly has been an stand out book for me this year; a constant source of both amazing writing and beautiful artwork. It’s really a disservice to the book to describe it this way, but it is almost like a contemporary retelling of the X-Men, with Magneto taking the place of Professor X. The plight of ostracized minorities and those considered ‘different’ is still in there, but instead of costumed super heroics there is brutal vigilante justice, and in place of sage guidance from a wise mutant there is an insidiousness and paranoia at every turn. In a year when X-Men comics were really not very good it has been a great relief to find a book that takes a similar concept and then tells a fresh and compelling story with it. They’re Not Like Us is a brilliant, dark, and thrilling book, and that is even before you take into account the outstanding art and colouring in every panel on every page.
Batgirl
Despite faltering somewhat in it’s sophomore arc this book remains a pleasure to read, due largely to the ever joyous artwork from Babs Tarr (the colouring from Serge LaPointe has been consistently wonderful too). Tarr’s art continues to elevate the book, even as the story elements that made the first arc such a success have fallen by the wayside. The overarching mystery that underpinned the narrative, the establishment of Barbara Gordon’s new life & friends in Burnside, the integration of contemporary visual elements like phone screens and playlists, and even the complex layouts demonstrating Batgirl using her eidetic memory, have all been oddly sadly absent. Fortunately there’s still that art from Babs Tarr, and a winning supporting cast that still make the book a strong read.
Descender
Of all the great new indie scifi books this year Jeff Lemire’s futuristic fable is the one that has captured my imagination most utterly. Following a cataclysmic and unexplained event (featuring giant Galactus sized robots!) a futuristic inter-planetary society spends decades picking up the pieces and persecuting the few regular sized robots that remain. The discovery of a particular AI, in the form of a small boy, brings together a ragtag band of unlikely heroes on a quest that really isn’t clear yet, but damn do I want to know where it goes next. The art is stunning, the characters are broadly drawn but engaging, and the universe is magnificent – this is Star Wars meets AI meets Darren Aronofsky, and it is sublime.
Prez
On paper this book sounds awful; the zany adventures of the first teen President of the United States. On actual comic book paper it is awesome. Besides anything else the top-notch art is by Ben Caldwell, someone who I’ve been waiting for more work from ever since he blew me away with his Wonder Woman pages way back in Wednesday Comics. And alongside those excellent visuals is a wonderfully sharp and pointed political satire, tackling everything from lobbyists to corporations to healthcare policy. Against the backdrop of an exaggerated, explicitly corrupt, hyper-capitalist America, writer Mark Russell works wonders telling an interesting, personal story about Beth Rogers, aforementioned teen President, but also manages to weave some genuinely worthwhile political debate into the book too. The first volume wrapped up this year, with another 6 issues allegedly planned for 2016 (sales sadly haven’t been great) – quite frankly EVERYONE should buy this so that we definitely get more issues!
Silver Surfer
If there is a character whose comic I never thought I would be at all engrossed by, even more so than teen President Rogers, it was the Silver Surfer. And yet, every month the combined talents of storytellers Dan Slott and Mike Allred have come up with outlandish, inventive, heartwarming, heartbreaking, space adventures for Norrin and his companion Dawn Greenwood to go on. This book is like the best of Star Trek and Doctor Who and Red Dwarf rolled in to one, and for every imaginative plot there is an innovative artistic representation to go with it (the time loop issue that has to be read backwards and forwards in a physical loop is a particularly stunning example). And not only is it a fun book with goofy aliens and comedy and spectacular space encounters, but the relationship at it’s heart, the blossoming love between Norrin and Dawn, is genuinely the most engaging romance in contemporary comics – it is lovely and realistic (in space!) and believable. Silver Surfer is somehow both a madcap adventure through the galaxy and a wonderful drama, and every issue is a marvel.

Pick of the Week

Secret Wars #8

Writer: Jonathan Hickman

Art: Esad Ribic

Color Artist: Ive Svorcina

Marvel’s collossol main event of the year rumbles on in this action packed installment. This issue is another solid addition to Hickman’s grandiose universe panning opra, that started way back with his run on Avengers and New Avengers. Now we are starting to see the fruits of this 2 plus year labor.  The story picks up where the last issue left off with an all out asault on Doom and Dooms castle. We see Star Lord and Reed Richards infiltrate Dooms layer in the hopes of bringing the God Doom down once and for all.  We get a glimpse of the newly freed Ben Grimm (who also apparently is a giant in this reality). Ben quickly make an impact with the killing of a major player (no spoilers), and with his lazer focus on killing Doom. Ben is impeded on this task by none other than a Franklin Richard’s (in this world Franklin Von Doom) controlled Galactus. The two exchange blows before……Well I’ll let you read what happens next. The following pages bring back a surprise character, and a bone chilling confrontation between Thanos and the God Doom himself. All leading up to the final page which show the one thing that in this reality that Doom is afraid of. The story is most excellently layed out for the reader. In the end I am glad they added on the extra issue, so that we can have a better sense of what is happening. This issue is just the right amount of chaos and action, a formula that would have been thrown out of whack by piling more into this issue than there already was. The art by Ribic continues to be spectacular. He has a way coaxing out the best facial expressions on his characters. The only down side to this issue is that the 9th installment has been delayed (again) until January. Making this the most delayed and drawn out event in recent memory. But hey at least the story is entertaining.

Rating: 8/10

Our 50th post: A nostalgia filled trip down memory lane

Hello Revuers, I’m proud to announce that this is our 50th post on Deja.Revue! When I started this site with my roommate back in November of 2014 I couldn’t have anticipated the great response and support from viewers like you. Thanks to die hard comics fan like us, we have grown exponentially over the course of ten months. I could ramble on and on with statistics and numbers and blah blah blah…….but I’d rather just bring you the high quality original content you’ve come to expect from us. Since I’m feeling reminiscent I’ve asked our writers and our guest reviewers to write about their most nostalgic issue or series from their childhood. I’m happy to report that this article turned out to be one of my favorite and I hope its yours too. As usual all names are clickable and you should check out our guest bloggers sites. They are all wonderful. Now, without further delay lets begin our nostalgia filled joyride through our childhoods.

Jerry Caskey

Associate Writer of Deja.Revue


Cloak and Dagger (1­-4)1983
Cloak and Dagger are the most basic opposites, light and dark. This is a common trope, and a simple but solid premise that allows the reader to accept these new characters without bogging down the story with exposition. As the story advances, the characters become more nuanced and interesting. Cloak is darkness. He must feed on the light of humanity to satisfy his cravings or suffer the maddening effects of hunger. If he does not feed, he will begin to consume his own humanity. Where Cloak is darkness and retribution, Dagger is light and forgiveness. She produces pure humanity in the form of daggers. These light daggers act as a jump start to give a person a chance to redeem themselves before Cloak enacts his more permanent form of justice. However, Dagger’s light is limited and thus can not redeem those too far gone nor can it totally satisfy Cloak’s hunger. In addition to seeking out the wicked, Cloak and Dagger must confront their own personal demons. In issue two, Dagger confronts a man whom she slaps across the room and states “My light knives are too good to waste on the likes of you!”. In retrospect she realizes that she acted without compassion. She must learn to control her emotions to give every person equal opportunity for redemption. Cloak begins to perceive himself as a burden on Dagger, causing him to spiral into a state of self­loathing and harm. Eventually banishing himself to the sewers in an attempt to not affect anyone instead of realizing the potential for good that he possesses. So enough about the series, why do I love it so much? Well let me tell you… Cloak is a badass. He is troubled and dark, and essentially everything he says is the basis of a death metal song. For example: “You have chosen your fate, scum of the street. Darkness seeks darkness. Let you soul now scream – as is greets a darkness greater than its own.” “I am shadow. I darkness deeper than any dungeon. I am called Cloak… and I hunger.” “There is only one law, detective, as this murderer of women and children shall soon discover… the law of retribution.” “I am not a man, detective. I am merely a being who exists from one day to the next – locked in a struggle between hunger and appeasing that hunger. But I have learned that if I am ever to again be a man – that hunger must be denied!” But his darkness dissipates in the presence of Dagger’s light. Both Cloak and Dagger deal with issues that I see in myself. The whole series provokes the idea that neither light, nor dark is the answer the the issues of humanity. Rather, it is a balance of good and evil.

Jaythreadbear

Hasty scribbler on comics and culture


Batman: The Long Halloween #1

When I was a much younger geek I followed my older brother into reading comics; my pull list consisting mostly of random Superman stories and Chris Claremont’s sub-X-Men for DC Sovereign Seven. At some point my brother quit comics in spectacular fashion selling off most of his collection and giving away the rest. One book that I was able to salvage from the flames was Batman: The Long Halloween #1. For some reason unknown to me even now it would be another few years until I actually read the thing, but boy when I did was my mind blown. Here was a comic that showed me what comics could really do; that amongst the kapow-action there could be smart plots and shocking surprises, and it could all be delivered with the perfect grace of Tim Sale’s elegant art.

In retrospect it is probably that gorgeous Sale artwork that does a lot of the heavy lifting on an issue by issue basis, keeping things flowing and providing a sublime canvas on which the story is drawn, but I wouldn’t want to do writer Jeph Loeb out of some well-deserved credit either. Sure, when reading the book again the strange choices and dubious pacing are a little more obvious (mostly due to the villain-an-issue structure), but there is still an intrinsic magic to the concept and plot. This is a vision of Batman’s early career that picks up on the oft-quoted but very rarely shown fact that Batman is allegedly the world’s greatest detective and runs with it all the way to the goal line. There are clues and red herrings and mis-directions and it all comes together with a perfectly satisfying conclusion by the time the story is done.

Seeing the last three ‘good’ men in Gotham (Jim Gordon, Harvey Dent, and Batman) come together to instill law, justice, and order makes for a wonderful story and it’s perhaps not surprising that the best Batman movie is built on the same foundation. Speaking of films it is probably fair to say that this is the greatest Godfather comic book out there too, as it draws heavily on the Coppola film visually and the Puzo novel narratively. Again the concept shines through with a unique take on the superhero genre as Loeb takes the decision to examine the fall of traditional crime in Chicago-inspired Gotham as clown princes and other such masked super villains take over the city.

After reading that first issue I was hooked and many anxious shopping trips at local comics fairs and back issue parlours followed. It took me a while to pick up every part of The Long Halloween, but it was well worth all of the searching. Tim Sale has continued to deliver amazing work since then, but the Loeb/Sale partnership never yielded anything quite so perfectly formed (even the sequel Dark Victory lacks a certain something) and I think this would probably be my choice for best Batman story too. For me it remains the quintessential tale of the dark knight; it demonstrates his detective skills as well as his physical prowess, it features his greatest allies and most dangerous villains, it paints a vivid picture of Gotham as a living place and more than just the backdrop to random adventures, and overall it makes for a compelling and beautiful read. Even after all these years and all the comics since this is still how I see the Batman, and for that I am very grateful to Tim Sale and Jeph Loeb.

The burning blogger of Bedlam


Fatal Attractions

When Andrew invited me to do this piece, my first thought was ‘oh,
this is going to be hard to pick’. But then my second thought was ‘oh
wait, no it isn’t!’

Because probably the comic book ‘event’ that has the most sentimental
attachment for me and that also ensured my lifelong status as a
comic-book reader was an event called ‘Fatal Attractions’ in 1993,
which briefly crossed over all the X-Men titles of the time. I had
been reading comics a couple of years by then, and in fact the first
comic-book event that really had been a big deal to me was the
legendary Claremont/Lee ‘X-Men: Mutant Genesis’ storyline from two
years earlier – which would be regarded as the prequel to ‘Fatal
Attractions’. Released in 1991, that had been the event that had
relaunched the entire X-Men mythology and ensured that the X-Men would
become a multi-media sensation and cultural phenomenon in the 1990s
and beyond. That story, which was at the time the farewell masterpiece
of Chris Claremont (who had been so important to the X-Men for so many
years) not only breathed new life into the X-Men but also established
Magneto as the most complex, fascinating ‘villain’ in Marvel Comics.

These first three issues of the then new ‘X-Men’ title told the story
of a reclusive and somewhat retired Magneto being reluctantly drawn
back into the mutant crisis on Earth and once again coming into
conflict with Charles Xavier and the X-Men (after years of having been
‘on the good side’). The story remains probably the greatest ever
exploration of that crucial Magneto/Xavier dynamic that for so long
epitmosed the X-Men mythology, and it all builds to its epic climaxe
in X-Men #3 where Magneto is betrayed and killed by one of his own and
Professor X can only look on helplessly as his friend dies. Both as
the beginning of a new X-Men era and as the sign-off for Chris
Claremont, this was the absolutely perfect story and event. But then
two years later, Magneto ‘returned’ from death (note: he wasn’t
technically dead, it turned out) and we got an even more epic story
and Shakespearean tragedy with ‘Fatal Attractions’.

Even though I’d read some ‘crossover’ events already by then
(Operation Galactic Storm, the Infinity War, etc), there was nothing
that blew away my 13-year-old self more than this X-Men event did.
Crossing Excalibur #71, X-Factor #92, X-Force #25, Uncanny X-Men #304,
X-Men #25 and Wolveirne #75, this storyline set the bar up to a whole
new level. Dealing centrally with the return of Magneto, these comics
were an obsession to me for years. The writing, the character work,
the dynamics, it was all epic.

There were so many unforgettable moments; the funeral of Illyana
Rasputin, the emergence of the character ‘Exodus’, the epic
confrontatino between Magneto and Cable, the defection of Colossus to
Magneto’s side, and of course everything culminating in that
unforgettable showdown between Charles and Magneto in X-Men #25, with
Wolverine getting the adamantium brutally ripped from his body and
Charles breaking all of his ethical codes by psychically assaulting
Magneto and leaving him a braindead vegetable. It was – and still is –
utterly gripping stuff, full of poetry and resonance, as if some great
literary figure was suddenly writing X-Men comics. And godammit, those
bad-ass holograms on each of the covers still hypnotise me every time
I look at them, even twenty years later! The Havok hologram for
X-Factor #92 has to be seen to be believed!

I was about 13 when these comics came out, but I still go weak at the
knees every time I come across them in my old collection. I must’ve
read these issues over the years about as many times as I’ve watched
Empire Stikes Back or Return of the Jedi. They’re that good.

Meta Desi

https://www.facebook.com/meta.desi.comics

https://www.facebook.com/scribblinakshay


G.I. Joe A Real American Hero #21 (“Silent Interlude”)

I2621479-gi_joe__1982_marvel__21 used to own a copy of this comic and to this day one of my biggest regrets is that I loaned it to a kid I knew and never saw it again.
Written by the legendary Larry Hama who crafted pretty much the entire series of over a hundred and fifty of these books for Marvel and ended up creating some of the most intriguing and definitely ahead of their time (and comic-medium) stories for what was meant to be just an add-on to a toy-line, this book is a prime example of what Hama and Marvel accomplished.
Simply put, this is a comic that has no dialogue.
None. Nada. Zip. Zero.
It starts off with Snake-Eyes (arguably either the coolest or most over-rated Joe ever) silently infiltrating a Cobra fortress in an attempt to rescue his comrade and beloved Scarlett. Meanwhile, in keeping with the less sexist tone of much of the series, Scarlett herself is busy extricating herself from the inside out quite capable – something that seems like nothing special until one considers how such things influence our minds as children and eventually as adults.

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Each page was filled with tension and I would be on the edge of my seat each time I read this comic, devouring the artwork on each page as he made his way through, silently taking out guards and even facing down and defeating Storm-Shadow and his ninja’s before making an explosive exit with his target acquired.
I had read none of the other comics and came to possess this in the late 80’s as a little tyke, purely by chance and knew the Joe’s only through the less intense/hard-edged cartoon series. Within these pages though I found a level of intelligent, well thought out and engaging story-telling that would never have been expected and the lack of dialogue and using visuals is a concept that has burned itself into my mind to this day with thus far two of my own published comics being in a similar vein (sans dialogue) and must I admit that until making this list I never truly realised where that interest in purely visual story-telling had been born.